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Addiction overview

Addictions are often described as an intense desire to use particular substances or activities, even at the detriment of work and family. They may start as a relatively mild preference but quickly snowball out of control under the wrong circumstances.

Compulsions, or irresistible urges, can become so intense, addicts will forgo basic life-necessities in favor of getting their next fix. When the addiction becomes this severe, it often leads to a seemingly never-ending cycle of life-threatening decisions. Common warning signs of addiction include alienation from friends and family, problems at work, money trouble, and even distinct personality changes.

Addiction of any kind is likely to become a source of stress for everyone involved. Loved ones are forced to pay extra attention to addicts in an effort to limit progression and relapses. For the addict, not only is addiction a source of mental strain, but it quite often manifests as physical weakening as well.

The first time using a given substance, or doing an activity such as gambling, is usually a voluntary decision. However, when reward responses in the brain are taken over by a particular stimulus, such as drugs, eating, or sex, this results in addiction. Making matters worse, the brain circuitry changes which occur alongside long-term substance abuse often take a long time to recover from fully.

That said, addiction is a very complicated topic we’re only just beginning to actually grasp. For instance, experts now believe using drugs or alcohol to help moderate your mood could have a larger impact on your prefrontal cortex than other types of addiction. Meanwhile, evidence also shows your genetic makeup plays a profound role in how your body reacts to substance abuse.

Addiction is one of the most common conditions in the world, with an estimated 72 million people in the US alone dealing with a significant addiction problem at one point in their lives. The most commonly abused substance in America is alcohol, followed by drugs, sex, food, and gambling. Sadly, reports also indicate only around 10% of people ever receive any treatment for their substance abuse issues.

If you’re worried that you or a loved one may be struggling with an addiction, be sure to consult with a doctor as soon as possible. It’s always best to check in with an expert before deciding how to move forward.

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Table of Contents

CBD Research For Addiction

potencial impact research overview

Addiction- Cannabidiol reduces cigarette consumption in tobacco smokers: preliminary findings

  • University College London
  • 2013

related conditions:

Addiction

This study of smokers found significant evidence CBD, taken as needed, drastically reduces the average number of cigarettes smoked. While the placebo group showed no difference in cigarettes smoked, the group given a CBD spray reduced their intake by ~40%. The team concluded their data should serve as a foundation for further study on the connection of CBD and impulse control.

Addiction- Cannabidiol inhibits the reward-facilitating effect of morphine: involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus

  • University of Crete
  • 2013

related conditions:

Addiction

Researchers wanted to study a previously unanswered question, what effect does CBD have on the brain stimulation reward system. They concluded CBD interferes with the brain mechanisms which are responsible for reinforcing compulsion strength. As such, they believe it could be an important part of the solution for opioid abuse.

Addiction- Cannabidiol, a nonpsychotropic component of cannabis, inhibits cue-induced heroin seeking and normalizes discrete mesolimbic neuronal disturbances

  • Mount Sinai School of Medicine
  • 2009

related conditions:

Addiction

Findings suggest CBD could be a potential treatment for severe drug abuse, thanks in part to its impact on compulsion vulnerability in rat models. They noted subtle deficits in the AMPA GluR1 and CB1 receptors were both normalized by treatment with CBD. Importantly, they found this impact didn’t degrade over time.

Addiction- Differential effect of cannabinol and cannabidiol on THC-induced responses during abstinence in morphine-dependent rats

  • University of Puerto Rico
  • 1975

related conditions:

Addiction

Researchers highlighted the differences between psychoactive and non-psychoactive cannabinoids in regards to impulse control systems. Morphine-dependent rat models were given various combinations of CBD, CBN, and THC before researchers concluded CBD is able to increase signs of morphine abstinence much more effectively than THC.

Addiction- Impact of cannabis use during stabilization on methadone maintenance treatment

  • Thomas Jefferson University
  • 2013

related conditions:

Addiction

The team concluded CBD may have significant uses for treatment of impulse control. Particular focus was placed on its association with abstinence, methadone dose, and adherence to the treatment. They noted a distinct effect on cannabinoid-opioid system interactions once the CBD treatment was established.

Addiction- Medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose mortality in the United States, 1999-2010

  • University of Pennsylvania
  • 2014

related conditions:

Addiction

Researchers investigated the possibility CBD and medical cannabis could help mitigate opioid overdoses. The team tracked all opioid deaths in the US between 1999 and 2010, sorting the data by state medical marijuana laws. They concluded states with robust CBD and medical cannabis industries had 24.8% fewer opioid-related deaths every year than states restricting access.

Addiction- Dysregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and associated signaling networks in brains of cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rodents

  • University of the Balearic Islands and Thematic Networks of Cooperative Research in Health
  • 2013

related conditions:

Addiction

Available evidence suggests the endocannabinoid system plays a vital role in the neurobiology of chemical dependence. Researchers concluded cocaine dependence was closely associated with a reduction in CB1 receptor function. Findings provide evidence that treatment with CBD could potentially be an effective treatment for impulse control.

Addiction- Comparison of cannabidiol, antioxidants, and diuretics in reversing binge ethanol-induced neurotoxicity

  • National Institute of Mental Health
  • 2005

related conditions:

Addiction

Substantial evidence suggests CBD can control oxidative stress. As such, the team evaluated CBD as a neuroprotectant in rat models. Treatment with CBD was shown to protect against hippocampal neurodegeneration when administered alongside an alcohol binge. They also were able to confirm this effect is dose-dependent.

Addiction- Transdermal delivery of cannabidiol attenuates binge alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in a rodent model of an alcohol use disorder

  • University of Kentucky
  • 2013

related conditions:

Addiction

The research concludes transdermal treatment with CBD effectively mitigates alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Interestingly, the team showed transdermal therapy with CBD was even more effective than intraperitoneal injections, 56.1% reduction vs. 50.6%. As such, they believe transdermal CBD should be seen as an effective treatment for alcohol-induced neurodegeneration.

Addiction- Cannabidiol for the treatment of cannabis withdrawal syndrome: a case report

  • University of São Paulo
  • 2013

related conditions:

Addiction

The researchers wanted to determine if CBD could be an effective treatment for the withdrawal symptoms that go along with THC abstinence, including anxiety, insomnia, migraine, loss of appetite, and more. The case study of a 19-year-old woman showed that treatment with CBD over ten days significantly reduced withdrawal symptoms during treatment.

CBD Research That Might Be Useful for Symptoms of Addiction

potencial impact research overview

Addiction- Cannabidiol reverses attentional bias to cigarette cues in a human experimental model of tobacco withdrawal

  • University College London
  • 2018

related conditions:

Addiction

The team was able to show that a single large dosage of CBD can effectively reduce the salience and pleasantness of cigarette cues. This effect was even demonstrated to last overnight and into the next day. Interestingly, while CBD did reduce the pleasantness, it wasn’t shown to reduce other withdrawal symptoms.

Nausea- Effect of cannabinoids on lithium-induced vomiting in the Suncus murinus (house musk shrew)

  • Wilfrid Laurier University
  • 2004

related conditions:

Nausea

CBD was shown to suppress nausea at lower levels than THC, but both active ingredients effectively treated vomiting. Interestingly, this effect was reversed by SR-121716 for THC, but the anti-nausea effects of CBD were not impacted.

Mood - Sub-chronic impact of cannabinoids in street cannabis on cognition, psychotic-like symptoms and psychological well-being

  • University College London, UK
  • 2012

related conditions:

Mood Disorders

A much lower rate of psychosis-like symptoms were found in those who used marijuana with contained both THC and CBD, compared with types high only in THC. Researchers conclude the CBD attenuates the psychotic-like effects, leading to a greater sense of well-being and an overall improved mood.

Addiction & CBD Research Overview

CBD has been a game-changer for people dealing with a myriad of different issues. It’s been especially impactful for individuals looking to break away from harmful addictions. There are several different ways in which treatment with CBD is shown to improve your addiction symptoms significantly.

One of the most obvious ways CBD can help addicts is by mitigating their cravings and improving impulse control. For example, a study out of the University College of London called, Cannabidiol reduces cigarette consumption in tobacco smokers: preliminary findings, concluded smokers who take a CBD spray as needed could reduce the number of cigarettes they smoke in a day by around 40%. An article called Cannabidiol reverses attentional bias to cigarette cues in a human experimental model of tobacco withdrawal, even showed a single large dose of CBD could dramatically reduce the pleasantness of cigarette cues.

Other reports have looked into what controls this effect. For instance, a study called Cannabidiol inhibits the reward-facilitating effect of morphine: involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus, showed CBD interferes with the brain stimulation reward system. They even went as far as to say CBD has the potential to be a vital part of solving the opioid crisis.

This sort of effect has already been shown in studies, such as Cannabidiol, a nonpsychotropic component of cannabis, inhibits cue-induced heroin seeking and normalizes discrete mesolimbic neuronal disturbances. The researchers discovered small changes in the AMPA GluR1 and CB1 receptors were normalized with CBD. Perhaps more importantly, this normalizing effect wasn’t shown to degrade over time.

We also have reason to believe this impulse control is more closely related to CBD than other endocannabinoids, such as THC. A report called Differential effect of cannabinol and cannabidiol on THC-induced responses during abstinence in morphine-dependent rats, tested various combinations of CBD, CBN, and THC, before determining CBD was most effective at reducing cravings in rat models.

Interestingly, CBD is also shown to work in tandem with some other mitigating treatments, such as methadone. A study entitled Impact of cannabis use during stabilization on methadone maintenance treatment, observed a distinct impact on the interaction between endocannabinoid receptors and the brain’s reward system after treatment with CBD was started.

Treatment with CBD has also been associated with the improvement of other symptoms, such as aches and anxiety. In fact, a report called Cannabidiol for the treatment of cannabis withdrawal syndrome: a case report, found as little as ten days of treatment with CBD could reduce addiction-related anxiety, insomnia, migraine, nausea, and more.

Other reports have backed up these claims. A report called Effect of cannabinoids on lithium-induced vomiting in the Suncus murinus (house musk shrew) showed CBD is effective at reducing vomiting at lower concentrations than other endocannabinoids. While Sub-chronic impact of cannabinoids in street cannabis on cognition, psychotic-like symptoms and psychological well-being, proves CBD can significantly reduce aches and pain.

However, probably the most significant discovery we’ve made about CBD in recent history involves how CBD reduces substance abuse-related damage. We have reason to believe that CBD usage has a widespread impact on the overall opioid epidemic, as demonstrated by Medical cannabis laws and opioid analgesic overdose mortality in the United States, 1999-2010. Researchers tracked all opioid-related deaths in the US between 1999-2010, and determined states which allowed CBD and medical cannabis had on average 24.8% fewer deaths per year.

Reports looking into the available research, such as Dysregulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and associated signaling networks in brains of cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rodents, have made similarly interesting discoveries. The team showed cocaine addiction was closely associated with deficits in the CB1 receptors, which CBD is known to help reinforce.

Even more importantly, we now have evidence suggesting CBD treatment can actually help protect your neurons from oxidative stress. A report called Comparison of cannabidiol, antioxidants, and diuretics in reversing binge ethanol-induced neurotoxicity showed a distinct decrease in hippocampal neurodegeneration during alcohol binges.

That said, there’s still a lot of mystery about the impact of CBD on brain function, but we’re discovering new benefits all the time. For example, a report called Transdermal delivery of cannabidiol attenuates binge alcohol-induced neurodegeneration in a rodent model of an alcohol use disorder showed transdermal CBD treatment is even more effective than intraperitoneal injections in rat models.

Best CBD for Addiction

Pure CBD Oil Capsules, (50mg)

Pure CBD Oil Capsules, (50mg)

description

Every Day Optimal Soft Gel PCR Hemp Oil Capsule contains 50mg of pure CBD.

$119.99
  • CBD Per Serving: 50mg
  • Number Of Servings: 30
  • Cost Per Serving: $4.00
  • Cost Per/mg of CBD: $0.08
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advantages

  • Easy Capsule Form
  • All Natural
  • GMP Compliant
  Servings per day Days supplied in one package Cost per week
Low Dosage (250 mg/day) 5.00 6.0 $139.99
Mid Dosage (500 mg/day) 10.00 3.0 $279.98
High Dosage (800 mg/day) 16.00 1.9 $447.96

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Relax Full Spectrum CBD Oil (3500mg)

Relax Full Spectrum CBD Oil (3500mg)

description

Relax Full Spectrum CBD Oil, available with an oil tincture dropper, delivers the ideal amount of CBD to meet all of your wellness needs. Made in the USA  from 100% high quality industrial hemp, this 3500 mg bottle of CBD is perfect for those wanting to combat stress, anxiety, and chronic pain.

$168.00
  • CBD Per Serving: 116.67mg
  • Number Of Servings: 30
  • Cost Per Serving: $5.60
  • Cost Per/mg of CBD: $0.05
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advantages

  • 100% Hemp Product
  • Made in USA
  • Full Spectrum
  Servings per day Days supplied in one package Cost per week
Low Dosage (250 mg/day) 2.14 14.0 $84.00
Mid Dosage (500 mg/day) 4.29 7.0 $168.00
High Dosage (800 mg/day) 6.86 4.4 $268.79

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Diamond CBD Full Spectrum Honey Tincture (2500mg)

Diamond CBD Full Spectrum Honey Tincture (2500mg)

description

These tasty new honey tinctures are made of 100% all-natural honey, presenting a delicious addition to how to deliver you with the ideal amount of CBD. Available in strengths ranging from 25mg to 3500mg, add it to your morning coffee, tea, or just use it throughout the day to sweeten up every moment while enjoying all of the awesome benefits that CBD offers.

$128.00
  • CBD Per Serving: 83.33mg
  • Number Of Servings: 30
  • Cost Per Serving: $4.27
  • Cost Per/mg of CBD: $0.05
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  • Honey Flavor
  • Control Over Dosing
  • All Natural Ingredients
  Servings per day Days supplied in one package Cost per week
Low Dosage (250 mg/day) 3.00 10.0 $89.60
Mid Dosage (500 mg/day) 6.00 5.0 $179.21
High Dosage (800 mg/day) 9.60 3.1 $286.73

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Suggested CBD Dosage for Addiction

Dosage Per Day

Low

250 mg

Mid

500 mg

High

800 mg

The question we get most often from our users is how much CBD should they take for a specific issue. We wish it were as simple as providing the precise amount for different conditions; however, each person is going to have a different ideal dosage.

The most common way people discover the right dose for them is by experimenting with different combinations. Since CBD isn’t a psychoactive substance like THC, you don’t have to worry about taking too much and being high.

That said, we can still provide a good starting point if you’re wondering where to begin. According to a report published earlier this year, large doses of CBD (between 400-800mg) once per day can have a significant impact on drug cue–induced craving and anxiety in drug-abstinent individuals. Depending on your size and symptoms, starting somewhere in this range is an excellent place to begin, but don’t be afraid to experiment.

We should also mention that while CBD has become commonplace in many areas, it’s still derived from cannabis and is therefore illegal in some places. You should always double-check local laws before starting CBD, and especially before you take some with you on the road.

It’s also important to note that while most CBD products don’t contain any THC, some do. These products are believed to be more effective in some stubborn cases, but since they contain THC, you must exercise much more caution when buying and using them. Always make sure the products you purchase are 100% CBD if you want to avoid any psychoactive response.

Regardless of what type of CBD product you purchase, be sure to track your symptoms in a journal every day. For many people, this is how they finally zeroed in on the perfect solution for them.

Tracking CBD Effectiveness For Addiction

If you’re like most people, you’re probably wondering what’s the best way to know if CBD is working the way it should. The truth is everyone is different, and what works for one person may not for another. That said, changes in impulse control and addiction tend to be relatively easy to remember.

One of the absolute best things you can do if you want to track how well CBD has worked for you is keeping a journal. Many people are amazed by how much of a difference simply noting their dosage and symptoms daily can make.

Everyone reacts differently to new medication, so you should always give your body time to adjust to the change. After a week or two of tracking your CBD intake and symptoms, most people can say with confidence if it was effective for them or not.

Keeping a journal can really help you hone in on how CBD has impacted each of your symptoms, including impulse control, anxiety, aches, and pain. It can seem a bit unnecessary at first, but if you stick with a journal, you’ll be amazed at how much insight you gain.

However you choose to track your progress taking CBD, we hope you’ll consider leaving a brief description of your experience here for others. It’ll only take a few moments, but you never know if your story could help improve someone’s life.

Simply leave your impression of how effective CBD is at treating addiction, along with a score between 1-10 for how it helped your impulse control, anxiety, and pain. By working together to spread the truth about CBD, we’re helping build a better, more well informed, world.

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