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IBS overview

Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, is a relatively common gastrointestinal problem that primarily affects the large intestine. It’s known to cause a wide range of issues in the digestive tract, including cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, excess gas, diarrhea or constipation, and even both.

IBS is a chronic condition that must be managed over the long term. While it’s relatively common, the majority of people with IBS don’t experience the worst symptoms. Many can manage their symptoms by altering diet and reducing stress. Medications are also available, which can improve the quality of life for those affected.

While the signs and symptoms of IBS can vary significantly, by far, the most common include things already listed, such as cramping, pain, bloating, diarrhea, or constipation. However, as things progress, you may begin to notice more severe symptoms that require attention from a doctor as soon as possible. These include weight loss, rectal bleeding, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

Symptoms are often triggered by different stimuli. For some people, this just means hormonal changes, while for others, it could be the result of stress. Another known cause of IBS is eating particular foods, although this isn’t yet well understood.

Many people living with IBS report a decreased quality of life. It’s not uncommon to be forced to miss important events because of a flare-up. When persistent, these issues can lead to mood disorders such as depression and anxiety. Likewise, depression and anxiety can make the symptoms of IBS much worse.

We don’t know the precise cause of IBS, but researchers have identified many factors that seem to play an important role. This variable list of potential causes includes things as different as muscle contractions, inflammation, infection, nervous system abnormalities, and changes in the microbiome. This illustrates why it’s so important to talk to your doctor if you believe you’re experiencing any issues.

Most people will have the occasional symptom or two of IBS, but there is a well-documented list of risk factors that increase your chances of having the condition. For instance, the majority of people who develop IBS are under the age of 50, with women being twice as likely than men to have IBS. Family history is also shown to increase chances, especially when combined with common environmental factors.

Estimates suggest IBS affects somewhere between 25 and 45 million people across the United States alone. It’s a widespread gastrointestinal problem, with about 20-40% of visits to gastroenterologists every year are related to IBS.

If you have any concerns that you or a loved one could be struggling with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, don’t hesitate to see a doctor as soon as possible. While there is no cure for IBS, proper treatment plans can significantly improve the quality of life for those affected. Only your doctor can accurately diagnose the issue and get you on the road to taking control of your life.

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Table of Contents

CBD Research For IBS

potencial impact research overview

IBS - Cannabidiol in inflammatory bowel diseases: a brief overview

  • Sapienza University of Rome
  • 2012

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

In this minireview, authors sought to highlight the promise CBD holds as a therapeutic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome, and other inflammatory bowel disorders. Authors noted the pharmacological promise cannabis-based preparations offer those suffering from inflammatory gut disturbances such as IBD. The authors concluded that CBD’s activity at extra-cannabinoid system receptor sites could make it a candidate for the development of a new class of anti-IBD medication.

IBS - Cannabidiol reduces intestinal inflammation through the control of neuroimmune axis

  • University of Naples Federico II
  • 2011

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Researchers wanted to investigate the effects of CBD on patients with various inflammatory gut conditions using rat models. The team found that CBD ultimately counteracted reactive enteric gliosis. This counteraction of an inflammatory environment indicates CBD offers significant promise as a therapeutic strategy for treating IBS and other inflammatory conditions.

IBS - Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD): can this concept explain therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions?

  • GW Pharmaceuticals
  • 2008

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

This review looked to examine the concept of clinical endocannabinoid deficiency and looks at the prospect that it may underlie a variety of treatment-resistant conditions, including irritable bowel syndrome. Researchers reviewed the currently available literature and highlighted the potential clinical ability of cannabis-based medicines, such as CBD, for treating clinical endocannabinoid deficiency. They believe this might be beneficial to those suffering from various treatment-resistant conditions.

IBS - Cannabinoid actions at TRPV channels: effects on TRPV3 and TRPV4 and their potential relevance to gastrointestinal inflammation

  • National Research Council
  • 2012

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

This study investigates whether cannabinoids activate or desensitize two “thermo-TRP’s” channels in the gastrointestinal tract, which may hold therapeutic potential in treating various GI-related conditions. Researchers found that CBD was more efficient at desensitizing these channels than activating them. The authors concluded CBD could affect both the activity and expression of these channels, offering potential therapeutic applications for those suffering from GI-related conditions.

IBS - Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid-based drugs

  • University of South Florida
  • 2007

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

This report notes the impact cannabinoid-based drugs have on the functioning of the endocannabinoid system in mammals. The team highlights the physiological impact cannabinoids may have on inflammatory markers and their potential for treating inflammation. Researchers concluded that although clinical trials were scarce at the time of publishing, preclinical data indicate that cannabinoid-based drugs may be remarkably effective in treating inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

IBS - Beneficial effect of the non-psychotropic plant cannabinoid cannabigerol on experimental inflammatory bowel disease

  • University of Naples Federico II
  • 2013

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

In this study, researchers investigated the effects of CBG in treating a murine model of induced-colitis using rat subjects. The team found that CBG has an inhibitory effect on nitric oxide production and oxidative stress, which may lead to gastrointestinal inflammation. The authors concluded that because of this effect, CBG could be considered for clinical experimentation for helping those suffering from IBD.

IBS - Cannabinoids and the gut: new developments and emerging concepts

  • University of Naples Federico II
  • 2009

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Cannabinoids, such as CBD, have played an important role in treating gastrointestinal conditions ranging from enteric infections to inflammatory conditions. The authors credit the discovery of this interaction as the primary driving force behind the rise of cannabis-based research and medicines over the preceding decades. They concluded these pharmacological interactions in preclinical models hold tremendous therapeutic potential for treating conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

IBS - Endocannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

  • Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz
  • 2006

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

This review of the available research highlights the role cannabis-based preparations have played over past centuries in treating gastrointestinal disorders such as GI pain, gastroenteritis, and diarrhea. Researchers found that under pathophysiological conditions, the endocannabinoid system offers protection to the GI tract from inflammation and abnormally high gastric and enteric secretion. The team concluded that endocannabinoid antagonists, such as CBD, might represent a promising therapeutic candidate for treating an array of GI disorders such as IBS.

IBS - Cannabinoids and gastrointestinal motility: animal and human studies

  • University of Naples Federico II
  • 2008

related conditions:

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

The researchers discussed the role cannabis has played in treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal disorders such as emesis, diarrhea, and inflammatory bowel disease and the promise for its future. The team notes the role a functional endocannabinoid system has on the larger GI tract, and the impact deficiencies may have on increasing inflammation. Researchers concluded that modulation of the endogenous cannabinoid system, such as with CBD, might be a useful therapeutic target for those suffering from GI disorders.

CBD Research That Might Be Useful for Symptoms of IBS

potencial impact research overview

Anxiety - Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence

  • University of Melbourne, Australia
  • 2013

related conditions:

Anxiety

A comprehensive review of all the plant-based medicine which has had both preclinical and human clinical trials conducted about their anxiolytic-like effect. An analysis of over 1500 papers identified 21 plants which had been adequately tested, with one of the most successful of these plants found to be CBD enriched Cannabis species.

Inflammation - Anti-inflammatory role of cannabidiol and O-1602 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

  • Tongji University School of Medicine
  • 2013

related conditions:

Inflammation

A study of mice concluded CBD has significant anti-inflammatory effects. The researchers also saw evidence that the expression of the GPR55 receptor was improved after starting on CBD. Treatment with CBD was shown to significantly decrease the levels of several inflammation-related chemicals in test subjects.

Nausea - Interaction between non-psychotropic cannabinoids in marijuana: effect of cannabigerol (CBG) on the anti-nausea or anti-emetic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in rats and shrews

  • Palo Alto University, CA, USA
  • 2017

related conditions:

Nausea

CBD was shown to significantly suppress vomiting in lab rats and shrews. Researchers used another substance, known as cannabigerol (CBG) to reverse this suppression. Moderate doses of CBG and CBD are opposing each other at the 5-HT1A receptor, which is known to play an essential role in regulating nausea.

IBS & CBD Research Overview

Most people are well aware of the hype currently swelling around CBD. Thanks to a growing pile of evidence, researchers have pieced together an expansive view of the many benefits CBD can provide via interaction with the endocannabinoid system. One possible new application for CBD, which has gained a lot of traction over the last 15 years, is for treating symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Researchers have known for a while that deficiencies in the endocannabinoid system could play a significant role in the development of many treatment-resistant conditions, including IBS. This was highlighted in Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD): can this concept explain therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions, which concluded that supplementation of the endocannabinoid system, such as with CBD, could be beneficial for treating these conditions.

Further inquiry into this question has identified specific ways this appears to happen. For example, the researchers behind Cannabinoids and gastrointestinal motility: animal and human studies, noted the vital relationship a functional endocannabinoid system has with a healthy digestive system. They believe more research is needed, but this connection is apparent. It’s no question whether or not CBD is a powerful anti-inflammatory medication thanks to many reports such as Anti-inflammatory role of cannabidiol and O-1602 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. The researchers were able to identify a powerful anti-inflammatory effect of CBD via interaction with the GPR55 receptor. After CBD treatment was started, levels of major inflammation-related chemicals in subjects decreased significantly.

Looking more specifically into IBS, there’s a ton of evidence supporting the power of a CBD regimen to control gastrointestinal inflammation. For starters, Cannabidiol in inflammatory bowel diseases: a brief overview, highlighted the value of CBD to significantly reduce inflammation related to gut disturbances. The team believed the presence of “extra” endocannabinoid receptors further bolsters the benefit provided.

This benefit is so substantial, it was one of the first things that researchers noted when the inquiry into CBD and IBS was first conducted. For instance, the team behind Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid-based drugs confirmed the power of CBD to control inflammation. What was more impressive, however, is that they were able to confirm this benefit despite an overall scarcity of available data at the time.

Cannabinoids and the gut: new developments and emerging concepts established that not only can CBD control gastrointestinal inflammation, but they credit this effect with boosting interest in cannabis-based medicine research over the last several decades. Their preclinical models prove CBD and other cannabinoids hold powerful potential for individuals who deal with acute inflammation related to IBS.

Other researchers have shown an expanded scope of effectiveness, with Endocannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract providing some compelling evidence. Their review of the available research found data that supports the value of cannabinoids, such as CBD, to control a wide range of GI tract disorders, including IBS. The team highlighted the centuries of historical evidence indicating humans have used cannabis to treat GI pain, gastroenteritis, and diarrhea.

While we have plenty of evidence confirming the power of CBD and cannabinoids to reduce inflammation in the GI tract, we are only starting to get more data about how this happens. For instance, Cannabidiol reduces intestinal inflammation through the control of neuroimmune axis showed relief from various inflammatory gut conditions was due to CBD counteracting reactive enteric gliosis cells. This counteraction was able to regulate inflammation enough for researchers to be very optimistic about their promise as a therapeutic strategy moving forward.

Other reports, such as Cannabinoid actions at TRPV channels: effects on TRPV3 and TRPV4 and their potential relevance to gastrointestinal inflammation, indicated CBD was able to efficiently desensitize two “thermo-TRP” channels, which research suggests may help control swelling. The team concluded that by interacting with and changing these channels, CBD could provide some relief for those living with various GI-related issues.

Finally, reports suggest inhibition of nitric oxide production could reduce oxidative stress and, in turn, reduce inflammation. The team behind Beneficial effect of the non-psychotropic plant cannabinoid cannabigerol on experimental inflammatory bowel disease found that cannabinoids, such as CBG and CBD, should be considered for further research into their benefit for those living with IBS.

Outside of improving the inflammation related to IBS, CBD could also provide relief from common side effects such as anxiety and nausea. Interaction between non-psychotropic cannabinoids in marijuana: effect of cannabigerol (CBG) on the anti-nausea or anti-emetic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in rats and shrews showed that while CBG could make nausea worse via interaction with the 5-HT1A receptor, CBD suppresses nausea at the same source. Additionally, the team behind Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence analyzed over 1500 preclinical and clinical trials on plant-based medications that deal with anxiety. Of the 21 potential medications identified, CBD was found to be the single most effective plant-based anxiety treatment.

Best CBD for IBS

NoteCBD Capsules (10mg)

NoteCBD Capsules (10mg)

description

Enjoy the benefits of hemp extract with the convenience of a capsule. Each capsule contains a pre-portioned dose of full-spectrum hemp extract and MCT oil.

$45.00
  • CBD Per Serving: 10mg
  • Number Of Servings: 30
  • Cost Per Serving: $1.50
  • Cost Per/mg of CBD: $0.15
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advantages

  • Full Spectrum
  • Lab Certified
  • Organic
  Servings per day Days supplied in one package Cost per week
Low Dosage (10 mg/day) 1.00 30.0 $10.50
Mid Dosage (25 mg/day) 2.50 12.0 $26.25
High Dosage (75 mg/day) 7.50 4.0 $78.75

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Pure CBD Oil Capsules, (50mg)

Pure CBD Oil Capsules, (50mg)

description

Every Day Optimal Soft Gel PCR Hemp Oil Capsule contains 50mg of pure CBD.

$119.99
  • CBD Per Serving: 50mg
  • Number Of Servings: 30
  • Cost Per Serving: $4.00
  • Cost Per/mg of CBD: $0.08
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advantages

  • Easy Capsule Form
  • All Natural
  • GMP Compliant
  Servings per day Days supplied in one package Cost per week
Low Dosage (10 mg/day) 0.20 150.0 $5.60
Mid Dosage (25 mg/day) 0.50 60.0 $14.00
High Dosage (75 mg/day) 1.50 20.0 $42.00

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NoteCBD Tincture (250mg)

NoteCBD Tincture (250mg)

description

Support your health and wellness with CBD-infused tinctures specifically formulated for human consumption. This tincture is made with full spectrum hemp oil, MCT oil, and essential oils.

$45.00
  • CBD Per Serving: 8.33mg
  • Number Of Servings: 30
  • Cost Per Serving: $1.50
  • Cost Per/mg of CBD: $0.18
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advantages

  • Full Spectrum Extract
  • Lab Certified
  • Made In USA
  Servings per day Days supplied in one package Cost per week
Low Dosage (10 mg/day) 1.20 25.0 $12.61
Mid Dosage (25 mg/day) 3.00 10.0 $31.51
High Dosage (75 mg/day) 9.00 3.3 $94.54

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Suggested CBD Dosage for IBS

Dosage Per Day

Low

10 mg

Mid

25 mg

High

75 mg

Without a doubt, the question we're asked most often has got to be precisely how much CBD should be taken for a given condition, such as IBS. While it would be ideal just to have the standard answer for everyone, the fact is finding an ideal regimen requires experimentation.

That said, we can offer a general starting location to begin your search. According to experts, starting low, around 15mg, and working your way up is the best way to zero in on the right dosing. While there aren't any major side effects to taking too much, you don't want to buy more than you need, and lower doses of CBD have still been shown to provide a powerful impact on certain conditions.

It's important to mention that while CBD has become commonplace in many places, it's not legal everywhere. In fact, some places still treat CBD and THC as virtually the same, so it's crucial to do your research when traveling.

We should also mention that while most CBD products may be CBD-only, that's not the case for all of them. In fact, there are a lot of primarily CBD products that still contain some THC to bolster the desired effects. If you're not willing or able to be impaired, be sure only to get THC-free products.

If you do choose to start taking a regimen of CBD, please consider leaving your experiences here for other people to learn from. We all have a bit of invaluable knowledge that, collectively, represent a massive pool of user-generated information and expertise. By working together, we're making the journey that much easier for the next person.

Tracking CBD Effectiveness For IBS

Many people find it difficult at first to get a handle on just how well CBD is working for them. This makes a lot of sense, as even when working correctly, CBD tends to have a more subtle effect than some medications. However, with a bit of patience and time, most people can understand if, and how well CBD is working to improve what ails them. This can definitely be the case for IBS, as it may take some time and adjustment before you identify what's changed.

The first thing we suggest to anyone starting a regimen of CBD is to keep a journal of their progress. While many people find this a bit odd, we assure you that nothing will make your chances of finding success with CBD higher than this simple trick. After just a few weeks of paying attention to your body and writing it down, you'll be amazed at how much more confident in your assessment of how it's working.

Everyone has a slightly different system, and as such, may require a different regimen to find success. That's why it's so important to focus on your personal experience and be sure to listen to everything your body and mind are telling you. That's the best way to get comfortable.

While some have been able to succeed without the use of a journal, we firmly stand behind the power of this easy tool. We've yet to find anyone who committed to a couple weeks of this technique and didn't come out with a better understanding of how CBD worked for them.

If you decide to track your progress, we ask that you consider leaving it here for newcomers to learn from. Everyone was a beginner at one point, so we can all remember how daunting it can be. By merely providing your experience along with a score for how well it improved any inflammation, pain, or nausea, you can help the next person up. Together we can build a world where everyone has the information they need to succeed.

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